This is part two of my previous post featuring newspaper clippings from the October 30, 1958 edition of the Page Signal, the forerunner to the Lake Powell Chronicle. Here’s some more happenings that were printed that week:

Source: The LeGate Family Page Signal: 10-30-1958
Source: The LeGate Family
Page Signal: 10-30-1958

If my compass is correct, this is a look east along North Navajo and Seventh Avenue (now Lake Powell BLVD) is about where the photographer is located. You can see some of the early businesses  and a little of the MCS trailer court in the top right of the photo. I talked about them in some previous posts. You can see a clearer picture of those first buildings —>HERE<—

Doctor Kazan was the happy recipient of Page’s 300th phone! You can see an under-construction picture of the Glen Canyon Clinic that the article references —>HERE<—.

Source: The LeGate Family Page Signal: 10-30-1958
Source: The LeGate Family
Page Signal: 10-30-1958

 

Source: The LeGate Family Page Signal: 10-30-1958
Source: The LeGate Family
Page Signal: 10-30-1958

It was a banner week for Page! It also got it’s 300th phone and its second gas station. I like how this story says it blossomed forth and that their new building will be a handsome one. Tenney’s Phillips 66 station was on the corner of 7th Avenue (now Lake Powell BLVD) and North Navajo. Is it still there? Anybody?

In addition to newly-paved roads, its 300th phone and 2nd gas station, Page also saw it’s first baby, born at the newly-opened Page Hospital.

Source: The LeGate Family Page Signal: 10-30-1958
Source: The LeGate Family
Page Signal: 10-30-1958

The hospital was a happening place that week. In addition to Page’s first birth, it saw its first patient. I left the unrelated blurb at the end in case anyone has questions about sheep and veggies in Iceland.

Source: The LeGate Family Page Signal: 10-30-1958
Source: The LeGate Family
Page Signal: 10-30-1958

Lastly, the shot below shows two of the newly installed cableway towers on the west side of the canyon. That side of the Beehive was cut off to make room for these cranes, not the visit center parking lot. In fact, the visitor center was located at the other end of the bridge during construction of the dam.

Source: The LeGate Family Page Signal: 10-30-1958
Source: The LeGate Family
Page Signal: 10-30-1958

I hope you enjoy these!

Mike

One thought on “A Day in the Life: 10-30-1958, Part Two

  1. The old Phillips 66 station was replaced by Red Mesa Express several years ago. Mr and Mrs Tenney are both buried in Page. Their home is still owned by their children. It is on Elm St and 5th Ave.

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