This first picture is undated, but it’s from the 60s. When I moved all of my pictures to a new computer, the meta data didn’t come with them, so I’ve lost all the dates and photographer info that was written on the back of them. But check this out:

That was then. Source: The LeGate Family. Undated

You might want to click on that picture and open it while we talk about it. This is a look down present-day Aero Ave, looking toward the airport. The long building in the center was (is?) the USBR warehouse. To the right of it is the bowling alley and below the bowling alley is the Page Boy Motel. The street at the bottom is Vista Ave. Looking down Aero Ave toward the airport, I believe the first long building on the left was Page Market. I seem to remember the H-shaped buildings being barracks and a mess hall built early on for construction workers on the dam. The small buildings lined up at the near end of the trailer court were early Page businesses. Rexall Drug, Page Jewelers, and a Men’s Store were among those buildings. Was there a shoe store there too, or was that part of the Men’s Store? It’s all a blur sometimes. The building below the Little League field on the right of the picture was the original location of Babbitt’s and First National Bank of AZ. I don’t remember if there was anything else in there. It looks abandoned in this picture, so the permanent buildings may have been in place by the time this photo was taken. To the right of the baseball field, you can see a little bit of the concrete slab that was used to show outdoor movies and for dances. Above it, you can see a corner of the MCS apartments. Do you see that building by itself on the curved road from the MCS apartments to the trailer court? Did that serve a dual purpose? Was it both the Teen Canteen and the American Legion hall? For some reason that sticks in my mind. If you look at the very top of the picture and zoom in, you’ll see the airport hanger on the left. The dark area just below the hanger was our trailer. The small trailer to the right of the hanger was the Bonanza Airlines terminal. There was also an elevated platform near that trailer that served as the “tower” for Bonanza Airlines. Whenever the airline was on its way in or taking off, the airline guy (I don’t remember his name, but he lived on First Ave) would go up on that platform and talk to the pilot via radio. As a young kid, I always thought that was pretty cool. Zoom into this picture and look at the detail. You’ll see people walking, cars on the move, and one car with its hood up.

Here’s a shot I took this morning from Google Earth, showing that same area. I tried to get as close as possible to the same angle. This screen shot was taken today, 3/31/18 but the info on the photo was dated 4/6/2015. Enjoy!

Thanks for visiting my site!

-Mike

5 thoughts on “Page Arizona: Then and Now

  1. Yes, Mike, there was another business in the little wooden buildings. Grant Jones had a shoe store there. By the side of the Babbitts building, there was also a barber shop and a beauty shop. The barber had a permanent shop on the same street as the Mesa theater and Grant had a shoe store also on that street. We moved into our transa-house on Dec. 8, 1957. It was the 4th house down from Aspen street on So. Nav.

  2. Thanks for all your work Mike. I have visited my Sister and her family that lived there for about 25 Years, I have become fascinated with the local people and history of the Town, I will for sure be going back to visit and explore, further.

  3. Great photos, Mike. As Ramona states, Grant Jones had a shoe store in the temporary buildings. They all moved into permant buildings as they were built in Block 17, the shopping center. One barber moved into the end of the building next to the bowling alley. I believe that was Hank Pfeiffer. The man at Bonanza Airlines for many years was Paul Drew.He later moved to Glendale Utah and developed an apple orchard there. The Babbitt building also had the post office for awhile. I think that I have a photo of that to send.

    You have a great memory.

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