Children at Play

Source USBR, Date Unknown

Do you recognize anyone in these photos? Are you in any of these shots? I don’t remember who supplied me with the picture above. It’s uncategorized in my files. But each time I open it, my eyes are drawn to what appears to be a Chevy Suburban behind the bus. After I stare at that Suburban for a second, wishing it was parked in my garage, I realize there are other things in this picture, like children and a school bus. 🙂  I don’t know where this was taken exactly. Maybe in front of the old Butler buildings? There’s no road curbing or pavement yet, if that’s the case. I’m having trouble identifying the plateau on the left side of the picture behind the Chevy. Here’s another one….

1957, Source: USBR

This basketball rivalry took place at the Transit Homes along South Navajo Drive. Are you in this photo or do you recognize anyone in it? If you are or do, please leave a comment below. I’d like to hear the story. The paragraph below concerning the above photo was sent to me from Donna Bloxton Petersen:

Steven Clark “Steve” LeClaire, Page High School Class of 1962, as an 8th grader, December 14, 1957, behind his pink “Transit-Home” near the PHS “Butler Buildings” on South Navajo Drive in Page, Arizona, playing basketball with Howard ’62 & John ’64 Perkins & Paul ’62 & Mack ’63 Page. Steve’s back is to the camera. He is third from left, if you count the boy in front of him. (USBR photo). Steve lived in Kanab, Utah, part of 1957, where he attended first semester of 8th grade while his dad worked on the Glen Canyon Construction Site until their Transit-Home had arrived in Page with the others that made a long row along S. Navajo Drive.

Source USBR, Date Unknown

Based on the building at the end of the road on the right side of this photo, it looks like it was taken on or near D, E, or F-Street in the MCS Trailer Court. Do you remember those buildings along that road to the airport? It’s called Aero Avenue today, the best I remember. Maybe it was called that then too, it’s all a blur at times. From the air, most of those buildings were H-shaped (not that spent a lot of time in the air or anything like that). Do you remember what was in them? If you do, leave a comment below. Also, if you were in this photo or recognize someone in it, please leave a comment.

Enjoy!

A Day in the Life: 10-30-1958, Part Two

This is part two of my previous post featuring newspaper clippings from the October 30, 1958 edition of the Page Signal, the forerunner to the Lake Powell Chronicle. Here’s some more happenings that were printed that week:

Source: The LeGate Family Page Signal: 10-30-1958
Source: The LeGate Family
Page Signal: 10-30-1958

If my compass is correct, this is a look east along North Navajo and Seventh Avenue (now Lake Powell BLVD) is about where the photographer is located. You can see some of the early businesses  and a little of the MCS trailer court in the top right of the photo. I talked about them in some previous posts. You can see a clearer picture of those first buildings —>HERE<—

Doctor Kazan was the happy recipient of Page’s 300th phone! You can see an Continue reading “A Day in the Life: 10-30-1958, Part Two”

If You Build It, They Will Come

These two photos from 1958 show the construction of the Page Hospital and Glen Canyon Clinic. In the shot of the clinic you can see that the top coat of pavement hasn’t been laid down on South Navajo Drive just yet. The new high school was probably under construction at this same time and would have been behind the photographer. I remember getting a lot of penicillin shots inside this building. I’m no doubt scarred for life. If you zoom in and look at the right side of the clinic, you’ll see a house under construction as well as the USBR admin building that I previously blogged about [HERE]. The back of the photo reads, “Doctor’s new clinic.”

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Photo: J. L. Digby, USBR
10/6/1958
Source: The LeGate Family

This next photo shows the hospital under construction in 1958. Notice the workers on the roof on the left side, working the electrical entrance. While walking past the hospital one day, yours truly was caught in a thunder storm and ran to the loading dock, which was near those electrical lines. While I as standing there watching the rain, lightening struck those lines and scared me to death.

In the distant background, this photo gives us a good look at Gunsight Butte and Tower Butte. In the nearer background, you can see the USBR warehouse and to the right of it, is the metal building that housed the post office for a time. You can also see the Continue reading “If You Build It, They Will Come”

A Tunnel Runs Through It

Here’s a couple of great shots of some unidentified workers in random tunnels in the rock around Glen Canyon Dam. The captions below the pictures tell you what was written or stamped on the back. I don’t know what these tunnels were used for, or if they’re still there. Enjoy!

Photo: F. S. Finch, USBR
4/27/1957
Source: The LeGate Family
The back of the photo reads, “Small tunnel in keyway. Used for what I don’t know.”
Photo: A. E. Turner, USBR
1/30/1958
Source: The LeGate Family
The back of this photo simply reads, “Tunnel in Keyway.”

-Mike

Lower Footbridge

Glen Canyon Dam lower footbridge under construction. 1958? Source unknown.
Glen Canyon Dam lower footbridge under construction. 1958? Source unknown.

Who remembers this? If you take a look at my last post, you’ll see a portion of this footbridge near the bottom of that photo. It spanned the lower part of the canyon at the approximate location of the present-day powerhouse. This picture is taken from the Page side at the bottom of the canyon. The powerhouse tunnel exit is behind the photographer and to his left. This is a good shot of the canyon wall at the spot where the dam now sits.

The footbridge is still under construction on this photo. Either that, or you had to get a running start to make it across. This picture is undated and I don’t remember now where I got it. But due to its quality and the fact that it’s black and white, I’m guessing it’s a USBR photo and that it was taken around 1958. But that’s just my best guess. If anyone can give me more info on the history of this bridge, please do.

-Mike

In Memoriam

The building of Glen Canyon Dam and Bridge wasn’t accomplished without great personal loss by some. I’m posting two photos this time because they are closely tied to one another. Here’s the first:

Photo: A. E. Turner, USBR Source: The LeGate Family
Photo: A. E. Turner, USBR 9/10/1958
Source: The LeGate Family

This photo is dated 9/10/1958. The handwritten caption on the back reads,

“Lower end of diversion tunnel and adit for powerhouse tunnel road. Right above the adit is where the man got killed Aug 11th. Rock ledge 200 feet above adit broke off. Small footbridge across river is at lower left.”

You can clearly see the lower opening to the powerhouse tunnel mentioned in the picture. It’s located at the base of the dam, next to the powerhouse. The lower footbridge mentioned in the caption and visible in the photo was at the approximate location of the powerhouse. My next post will be a better look at that lower footbridge. The powerhouse tunnel runs along the inside of the canyon wall from behind the old Country Club/golf course on top, to this point below. It’s still in use. The adits mentioned in the caption are the smaller horizontal tunnels that intersect the main tunnel at 90 degrees at regular intervals, primarily for ventilation. If you scroll back up to the picture, you’ll see the adit that is mentioned in the caption.

This photo was taken or cataloged one day short of a month following a fatality at this location that occurred on 8/11/1958. The photo caption mentions that a rock ledge broke off above the adit and killed a man. According to the memorial plaque below, the individual’s name was Austin Merritt. He joins 17 others who lost their lives in the Glen Canyon Dam project. All of them are listed here:

This memorial lists the names of the 18 individuals who lost their lives during the construction of Glen Canyon Dam and bridge. Source: Unknown
This memorial lists the names of the 18 individuals who lost their lives during the construction of Glen Canyon Dam and bridge. Source: Wmpearl (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons
The above memorial plaque was created by WMPearl in 2011 and is posted on Wikimedia Commons. I don’t know where it physically resides. Click [HERE] to view the source website at Wikimedia.

In the early 1970’s, one of my friends told me that her father was killed during the building of the dam. His name is listed at the top of the middle column, Raymond D White.

UPDATE 5/24/17: Here’s a list of memorials of the names on the plaque compiled by Donna Bloxton Petersen. Thank you Donna for all the time and work you put into this!

-Mike

Hamburgers and Hotdogs

Photo: J. L. Digby, USBR 10/6/1958 Courtesy of the LeGate family.
Photo: J. L. Digby, USBR
10/6/1958
Courtesy of the LeGate family.

This picture, dated 1/6/1958 is another view of the post office with the USBR warehouse behind it. The warehouse is still there, but this post office is long gone. The Windy Mesa was eventually built just to the right of where this post office sat, on North Navajo Drive. This picture was taken from the approximate location of present day Stromboli’s. The fire station and old USBR ranger station were to the left of this picture. I did a separate post about this post office building [HERE]. Now I know where it was located.

I’m not sure if the hamburger and hotdog stand was a regular event, or if there was something special going on this day.

-Mike

Bridge Under Construction

Photo: A. E. Turner, USBR 8/6/1958 Courtesy of the LeGate family.
Photo: A. E. Turner, USBR
8/6/1958
Courtesy of the LeGate family.

The back caption on this photo dated 8/6/1958 reads, “Men working on bridge. View point for visitors in background.” I’ve mentioned the old visitor’s center and the lookout point in a few of my previous posts. You can see the parking lot in the background on the Page side of the canyon in this picture. Access to the parking lot and lookout was from US 89, just above this photo. The camera angle is pointing almost directly to Manson Mesa and Page.

You can see the walkway coming off the right side of the parking lot. It looped back to the covered lookout point below the parking lot. You can see some people there (just in front of the guy in white) taking advantage of the good view. Yours truly took advantage of that view countless times too. The guy at the bottom of the picture looks like he’s carrying something pretty heavy. The guy in front of him looks to be texting. 🙂

This picture looks to have been taken just past the center of the bridge on the Page side of the bridge as you can see the arch beginning its downward slope on the left toward the canyon wall. You can get  good look at the net below too.

Manson Mesa Pool

Manson Mesa Pool Under Construction
10/6/1958
Photo: J. L. Digby, USBR
Courtesy of the LeGate Family

Who remembers the Manson Mesa Pool? I sure do. I spent many hours in that pool on those long, lazy summer days. I even spent a lot of time in it after it was closed down and drained. But that’s another story for another time. This photo is dated 10/6/1958 and the back caption simply reads, “Swimming pool.”

The Manson Mesa Pool was located on South Navajo Drive, adjacent to the park, on the corner of Seventh Avenue (now Lake Powell Blvd) and South Navajo. This photo was taken from near the curb of South Navajo, looking north-ish, parallel to Seventh Avenue. The Pink Sans Drive-in is (or soon will be) to the right of this picture, across Seventh Avenue. The park will be to the left of the picture. The brick building in the distance, just to the left, is the Page Hospital. It appears to be under construction in this photo. The white building to the left of the hospital is the USBR HQ that I blogged about in a previous post. I don’t know who the worker is in this picture.

There is no evidence today that this pool ever existed, much like the old drive-in theatre. Progress?

-Mike

The Crane! The Crane!

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Photo: A. E. Turner, USBR
7/21/1958
Courtesy of the LeGate family.

This photo had some water damage, so I’m glad I was able to scan it. It’s dated 7/21/1958 and the handwritten description on the back reads, “Tower for cableway under construction.” This was one of three towers on this side of the canyon that rode on railways. This one may have been in a fixed position. I don’t remember for sure. There were three more on the Page side of the canyon. Cables spanned the canyon from these towers and were used to dump concrete, move material, and transport workers into and out of the canyon.

This one is shown on what is today, the upper parking lot of the Visitor’s Center. The Visitor Center itself would eventually be built to the left of this picture.

-Mike