PHS Class Reunion

Source: USBR via the LeGate family. Undated.

I’m glad I was able to scan this photo before there was any more water damage. I’m not sure what this meeting was about, or where it occurred for sure. There was nothing written on the back. Was this inside the USBR warehouse? Are you in this picture? Do you recognize anyone in it? Please leave me a comment if you do.

UPDATE: I’ve had to change my plans and I won’t be able to attend the PHS class reunion. I hope you all have a good time!

-Mike

On The Streets

Here’s a look back and a reminder of how Page looked in those early days. Most of these photos are scattered throughout other posts but I wanted to get them into the same post, so here they are!

B Street in the MCS Trailer Court. Photo courtesy of Petey Lloyd Dietz

 

1957 Page Business District. Donna Taylor (the first graduate of PHS) and Petey Lloyd Dietz talking in front of Babbitt’s. This building was located behind present-day Stix Market. The MCS Trailer Court is visible in the background. Photo courtesy of Petey Lloyd Dietz.

 

Ernie Severino inside the original Page Jewelers. Photo courtesy of Ernie Severino Jr. Undated.

 

Here’s a shot of the old Barber Shop and Post Office. The sign on the barber shop door says there were 3 barbers at that time. I only remember Hank. Photo courtesy of Petey Lloyd Dietz. Undated.

 

Here’s a nice view of the MCS Trailer Court. Photo courtesy of Petey Lloyd Dietz. Undated.

 

Mike Severino in front of present-day Lake Powell BLVD. That’s Keisling’s service station on the right. Photo Courtesy of Ernie Severino Jr. April, 1962

 

These huts housed a handful of Page businesses in those early years. Most (if not all) of the business owners lived in trailers next to their store as seen in this photo. These buildings were along North Navajo Drive opposite the USBR warehouse. Babbitt’s, the bank, etc were located to the right of this picture. Photo courtesy of Ernie Severino Jr. Undated.

 

One of those early businesses was The Men’s Store. The closing of this store may have coincided with the strike in 1959. If anyone can confirm or deny that, please let me know. Photo courtesy of USBR. Undated.

 

Another perspective on the old business huts that were along North Navajo Drive. If I remember right, Firestone was owned by the Warners. You can zoom in to see the other signs. Photo courtesy of Terry Edwards. There is no specific date but it was late 50s or very early 60s.

 

That’s all for now. Enjoy!

The Real First Bucket

Photo: A. E. Turner, USBR dated 5-26-1960. Courtesy of Petey Lloyd Dietz.

This photo of Petey Lloyd Dietz and Linda Farris is amazing and it’s one of my faves! This is the real first bucket in my opinion! The back of the photo reads “P-557-420-4905, Glen Canyon Dam. Petey Lloyd and Linda Farris demonstrate the procedure for releasing concrete from the giant 12-cubic-yard capacity concrete bucket. They show how Secretary of the Interior Fred A Seaton will pull the lanyard and trip the first bucket of concrete on June 17, 1960.  5/26/60, Bureau of Reclamation Photo by: A.E. Turner”

Petey told me, “PS  Our father, Lewis H. Lloyd, was the (first) concrete superintendent on the dam from 1957 – 1963. Perhaps I had a little ‘in’ on being selected for this photo.” 🙂

Thank you for this Petey!

LINK: Remembering Linda Farris

-Mike

British Royalty Arrives in Page

Photo courtesy USBR. November 13, 1965. Source: Terry Edwards

On November 13, 1965, Princess Margaret and Lord Snowdon arrived in Page where they were greeted by approximately 500 residents. They stayed at the Lake Powell Motel that was located on Highway 89, but has since been torn down. L-R in the photo above: Dora Knight; U.S Ambassador to the UK, Lewis Williams Douglas (more info); Rosalind Acothley (in traditional Navajo dress, with her back to the camera); Lord Snowdon; Princess Margaret; and Royce Knight. Art and Bill Greene are the two men at the far right of the photo.

Here are some other sources you might be interested in concerning this visit:

-Enjoy!

Page Signal: Doctor Kazan

Here’s a short article about Dr. Kazan from the Page Signal and dated January 9, 1959. Dr Kazan was the only doctor in Page in those early days.

Page Signal, Doctor Kazan, dated 1-9-59. Source: Tim McDaniels

Page Arizona: Then and Now

This first picture is undated, but it’s from the 60s. When I moved all of my pictures to a new computer, the meta data didn’t come with them, so I’ve lost all the dates and photographer info that was written on the back of them. But check this out:

That was then. Source: The LeGate Family. Undated

You might want to click on that picture and open it while we talk about it. This is a look down present-day Aero Ave, looking toward the airport. The long building in the center was (is?) the USBR warehouse. To the right of it is the bowling alley and below the bowling alley is the Page Boy Motel. The street at the bottom is Vista Ave. Looking down Aero Ave toward the airport, I believe the first long building on the left was Page Market. I seem to remember the H-shaped buildings being barracks and a mess hall built early on for construction workers on the dam. The small buildings lined up at the near end of the trailer court were early Page businesses. Rexall Drug, Page Jewelers, and a Men’s Store were among those buildings. Was there a shoe store there too, or was that part of the Men’s Store? It’s all a blur sometimes. The building below the Little League field on the right of the picture was the original location of Babbitt’s and First National Bank of AZ. I don’t remember if there was anything else in there. It looks abandoned in this picture, so the permanent buildings may have been in place by the time this photo was taken. To the right of the baseball field, you can see a little bit of the concrete slab that was used to show outdoor movies and for dances. Above it, you can see a corner of the MCS apartments. Do you see that building by itself on the curved road from the MCS apartments to the trailer court? Did that serve a dual purpose? Was it both the Teen Canteen and the American Legion hall? For some reason that sticks in my mind. If you look at the very top of the picture and zoom in, you’ll see the airport hanger on the left. The dark area just below the hanger was our trailer. The small trailer to the right of the hanger was the Bonanza Airlines terminal. There was also an elevated platform near that trailer that served as the “tower” for Bonanza Airlines. Whenever the airline was on its way in or taking off, the airline guy (I don’t remember his name, but he lived on First Ave) would go up on that platform and talk to the pilot via radio. As a young kid, I always thought that was pretty cool. Zoom into this picture and look at the detail. You’ll see people walking, cars on the move, and one car with its hood up.

Here’s a shot I took this morning from Google Earth, showing that same area. I tried to get as close as possible to the same angle. This screen shot was taken today, 3/31/18 but the info on the photo was dated 4/6/2015. Enjoy!

Thanks for visiting my site!

-Mike

Glen Canyon Bridge Dedication

The dedication ceremony of Glen Canyon Bridge took place on Friday, February 20, 1959. My understanding of that event (we moved there shortly after the bridge was dedicated) is that the ribbon-cutting was actually a chain-cutting using a cutting torch and once the chains were cut, the crowds quickly moved onto the bridge to take a look below at the beginnings of Glen Canyon Dam. The pictures below capture some of that day. If you were there, I’d love to hear your story in the comments. Enjoy!

Glen Canyon Bridge Dedication, 1959. Source: Terry Edwards. USBR photo.

The photo above is taken from above the beehive, looking back toward Page. If you click on the picture you’ll be able to zoom in and see the detail. Look at the number of cars parked on the Page side of the bridge and the line of cars still arriving on US89 in the distance. You can also see the original visitor’s lookout near the top of the canyon wall on the Page side of the canyon.

Glen Canyon Bridge Dedication, 1959. Source: Terry Edwards. USBR photo.

The photo above is a look from the Page side of the bridge. Check out the ambulance, the ’57 Chevy, and the old busses. The ambulance is visible in the first picture above by zooming into it.

Glen Canyon Bridge Dedication, 1959. Source: USBR.

Click on the above photo and look at the detail. The parking lot on the right was for visitors and there was a walking path down to the lookout point that I mentioned in the first picture, also clearly visible in this photo. The buses in the previous photo are visible in this one, to the right of the bridge. The first visitor center would eventually be placed on US89 between where those busses are parked and the end of the bridge. Looking in the canyon, the ledge has been cut in the canyon wall for the concrete batch plant but it’s not there yet. You can also see the keyways are cut for where the dam would be anchored to the canyon walls. The lower footbridge is visible near the bottom of the photo and the upper footbridge can

A still from the TV series, Route 66: Layout at Glen Canyon, 1960.

be seen in the background. No dam yet, but it’s on its way. You can see water flowing through the right diversion tunnel. Right and left seem relative, but in previous photos, right and left are usually referenced from the upstream side of the dam. If you watched the episode of Route 66 that I’ve talked about in previous posts, the small photo to the left is from a scene filmed just above the diversion tunnel outlet that was filmed about a year after the dam dedication. That episode is worth watching for the historical value. The scene at the spillway shows the force of the water through the tunnel and the construction sounds of the dam will never be repeated.

Glen Canyon Bridge Dedication, 1959. Source: USBR.

The above photo is like the “Where’s Waldo” of bridge dedications. Are you in this picture, or do you recognize someone who is? If so, please leave a comment and let me know.

Glen Canyon Bridge Dedication, 1959. Source: Donna Bloxton Petersen

The photo above was sent to me by Donna Bloxton Petersen with this caption, “Glen Canyon Bridge Dedication or First Bucket of Concrete for GC Dam when Paul Fannin was Governor – by Donna Burgess Kielland” I’m going with the bridge dedication since there is only one crane tower built and it may not be completely built (two more were built on that side of the canyon). Those three cranes were used in conjunction with the three on the opposite side of the canyon to lower the concrete buckets (and other things) into the lower canyon.

Source: Page Signal dated February 4, 1959.

 

Glen Canyon Bridge Dedication, 1959. Source: USBR.

Until next time… Enjoy and share!

Mike

New Episode on Mike’s Dam Podcast

Hey friends, I published a new episode on the podcast today. Check it out when you get time.

Episode 2: Introduction

Enjoy!

Mike’s Dam Podcast

Hey friends, it’s official! It’s going to happen! Mike’s Dam Podcast – the podcast that’s all about remembering life during the construction of Glen Canyon Dam, Page Arizona, and Lake Powell via conversations and interviews launches on January 2, 2018. Tell your friends, tell your enemies. Tell people you don’t even know. Mike’s Dam Podcast rolls out in the new year. The bare bones of the new podcast site are there if you want to get a preview. It’s not much yet and the episodes won’t start rolling your way until the launch date, but you can find it and bookmark it now at https://mikesdampodcast.com/.

I’ve also renamed this photo blog to Mike’s Dam Photo Blog. I’m starting to see a pattern as things take on a “Dam” branding! The web address is the same and remains unchanged because there are so many links back to me from different sources/people and I don’t want to break those. I’m excited to launch the new podcast and see where it goes and how it’s received. Thank you all for your continued support of my efforts in this endeavor and for all of you who suggested names for the podcast. You guys rock!

-Mike

Airing Their Laundry

Photo: USBR? Undated. Source: Terry Edwards

This is a fantastic photo! It captures a true moment in the pioneering life of early Page. I’ve closely studied the details in this picture and I’ve concluded that this was taken from behind the transit homes, near South Navajo Drive and Aspen Street. If you click on the pic and open it, you can zoom in and take a look at some of the detail with me. Do you see the tanks on the right side of the image? You can get another look at them in THIS EARLIER POST of the transit homes to see what I’m referring to. In the picture above, the building to the left of the silver tank may be one of the Butler Buildings that housed the first school. Once zoomed in, you can see the canyon in the distance under the laundry. Also notice the second person hanging up clothes and what may be a little girl sitting by the car.

If you know who this woman is, please let me know.

-Mike