PHS Class Reunion

Source: USBR via the LeGate family. Undated.

I’m glad I was able to scan this photo before there was any more water damage. I’m not sure what this meeting was about, or where it occurred for sure. There was nothing written on the back. Was this inside the USBR warehouse? Are you in this picture? Do you recognize anyone in it? Please leave me a comment if you do.

UPDATE: I’ve had to change my plans and I won’t be able to attend the PHS class reunion. I hope you all have a good time!

-Mike

On The Streets

Here’s a look back and a reminder of how Page looked in those early days. Most of these photos are scattered throughout other posts but I wanted to get them into the same post, so here they are!

B Street in the MCS Trailer Court. Photo courtesy of Petey Lloyd Dietz

 

1957 Page Business District. Donna Taylor (the first graduate of PHS) and Petey Lloyd Dietz talking in front of Babbitt’s. This building was located behind present-day Stix Market. The MCS Trailer Court is visible in the background. Photo courtesy of Petey Lloyd Dietz.

 

Ernie Severino inside the original Page Jewelers. Photo courtesy of Ernie Severino Jr. Undated.

 

Here’s a shot of the old Barber Shop and Post Office. The sign on the barber shop door says there were 3 barbers at that time. I only remember Hank. Photo courtesy of Petey Lloyd Dietz. Undated.

 

Here’s a nice view of the MCS Trailer Court. Photo courtesy of Petey Lloyd Dietz. Undated.

 

Mike Severino in front of present-day Lake Powell BLVD. That’s Keisling’s service station on the right. Photo Courtesy of Ernie Severino Jr. April, 1962

 

These huts housed a handful of Page businesses in those early years. Most (if not all) of the business owners lived in trailers next to their store as seen in this photo. These buildings were along North Navajo Drive opposite the USBR warehouse. Babbitt’s, the bank, etc were located to the right of this picture. Photo courtesy of Ernie Severino Jr. Undated.

 

One of those early businesses was The Men’s Store. The closing of this store may have coincided with the strike in 1959. If anyone can confirm or deny that, please let me know. Photo courtesy of USBR. Undated.

 

Another perspective on the old business huts that were along North Navajo Drive. If I remember right, Firestone was owned by the Warners. You can zoom in to see the other signs. Photo courtesy of Terry Edwards. There is no specific date but it was late 50s or very early 60s.

 

That’s all for now. Enjoy!

The Real First Bucket

Photo: A. E. Turner, USBR dated 5-26-1960. Courtesy of Petey Lloyd Dietz.

This photo of Petey Lloyd Dietz and Linda Farris is amazing and it’s one of my faves! This is the real first bucket in my opinion! The back of the photo reads “P-557-420-4905, Glen Canyon Dam. Petey Lloyd and Linda Farris demonstrate the procedure for releasing concrete from the giant 12-cubic-yard capacity concrete bucket. They show how Secretary of the Interior Fred A Seaton will pull the lanyard and trip the first bucket of concrete on June 17, 1960.  5/26/60, Bureau of Reclamation Photo by: A.E. Turner”

Petey told me, “PS  Our father, Lewis H. Lloyd, was the (first) concrete superintendent on the dam from 1957 – 1963. Perhaps I had a little ‘in’ on being selected for this photo.” 🙂

Thank you for this Petey!

LINK: Remembering Linda Farris

-Mike

British Royalty Arrives in Page

Photo courtesy USBR. November 13, 1965. Source: Terry Edwards

On November 13, 1965, Princess Margaret and Lord Snowdon arrived in Page where they were greeted by approximately 500 residents. They stayed at the Lake Powell Motel that was located on Highway 89, but has since been torn down. L-R in the photo above: Dora Knight; U.S Ambassador to the UK, Lewis Williams Douglas (more info); Rosalind Acothley (in traditional Navajo dress, with her back to the camera); Lord Snowdon; Princess Margaret; and Royce Knight. Art and Bill Greene are the two men at the far right of the photo.

Here are some other sources you might be interested in concerning this visit:

-Enjoy!

Glen Canyon Bridge Dedication

The dedication ceremony of Glen Canyon Bridge took place on Friday, February 20, 1959. My understanding of that event (we moved there shortly after the bridge was dedicated) is that the ribbon-cutting was actually a chain-cutting using a cutting torch and once the chains were cut, the crowds quickly moved onto the bridge to take a look below at the beginnings of Glen Canyon Dam. The pictures below capture some of that day. If you were there, I’d love to hear your story in the comments. Enjoy!

Glen Canyon Bridge Dedication, 1959. Source: Terry Edwards. USBR photo.

The photo above is taken from above the beehive, looking back toward Page. If you click on the picture you’ll be able to zoom in and see the detail. Look at the number of cars parked on the Page side of the bridge and the line of cars still arriving on US89 in the distance. You can also see the original visitor’s lookout near the top of the canyon wall on the Page side of the canyon.

Glen Canyon Bridge Dedication, 1959. Source: Terry Edwards. USBR photo.

The photo above is a look from the Page side of the bridge. Check out the ambulance, the ’57 Chevy, and the old busses. The ambulance is visible in the first picture above by zooming into it.

Glen Canyon Bridge Dedication, 1959. Source: USBR.

Click on the above photo and look at the detail. The parking lot on the right was for visitors and there was a walking path down to the lookout point that I mentioned in the first picture, also clearly visible in this photo. The buses in the previous photo are visible in this one, to the right of the bridge. The first visitor center would eventually be placed on US89 between where those busses are parked and the end of the bridge. Looking in the canyon, the ledge has been cut in the canyon wall for the concrete batch plant but it’s not there yet. You can also see the keyways are cut for where the dam would be anchored to the canyon walls. The lower footbridge is visible near the bottom of the photo and the upper footbridge can

A still from the TV series, Route 66: Layout at Glen Canyon, 1960.

be seen in the background. No dam yet, but it’s on its way. You can see water flowing through the right diversion tunnel. Right and left seem relative, but in previous photos, right and left are usually referenced from the upstream side of the dam. If you watched the episode of Route 66 that I’ve talked about in previous posts, the small photo to the left is from a scene filmed just above the diversion tunnel outlet that was filmed about a year after the dam dedication. That episode is worth watching for the historical value. The scene at the spillway shows the force of the water through the tunnel and the construction sounds of the dam will never be repeated.

Glen Canyon Bridge Dedication, 1959. Source: USBR.

The above photo is like the “Where’s Waldo” of bridge dedications. Are you in this picture, or do you recognize someone who is? If so, please leave a comment and let me know.

Glen Canyon Bridge Dedication, 1959. Source: Donna Bloxton Petersen

The photo above was sent to me by Donna Bloxton Petersen with this caption, “Glen Canyon Bridge Dedication or First Bucket of Concrete for GC Dam when Paul Fannin was Governor – by Donna Burgess Kielland” I’m going with the bridge dedication since there is only one crane tower built and it may not be completely built (two more were built on that side of the canyon). Those three cranes were used in conjunction with the three on the opposite side of the canyon to lower the concrete buckets (and other things) into the lower canyon.

Source: Page Signal dated February 4, 1959.

 

Glen Canyon Bridge Dedication, 1959. Source: USBR.

Until next time… Enjoy and share!

Mike

Airing Their Laundry

Photo: USBR? Undated. Source: Terry Edwards

This is a fantastic photo! It captures a true moment in the pioneering life of early Page. I’ve closely studied the details in this picture and I’ve concluded that this was taken from behind the transit homes, near South Navajo Drive and Aspen Street. If you click on the pic and open it, you can zoom in and take a look at some of the detail with me. Do you see the tanks on the right side of the image? You can get another look at them in THIS EARLIER POST of the transit homes to see what I’m referring to. In the picture above, the building to the left of the silver tank may be one of the Butler Buildings that housed the first school. Once zoomed in, you can see the canyon in the distance under the laundry. Also notice the second person hanging up clothes and what may be a little girl sitting by the car.

If you know who this woman is, please let me know.

-Mike

Country Club Living

This picture is undated and I don’t remember where I got it. I’m guessing it’s 1962-ish, based on the height of the dam and the fact it’s not visible yet. It gets pretty grainy when you zoom in, so I can’t make out any of the faces. But I think the guy in the white shirt standing in the back on the left could be Royce Knight. Just a guess. How about you? Do you recognize anyone? Check out the chaise lounge chairs. And that poor tree needs to be staked before the Page winds rip it out of the ground! Enjoy!

 

A Few More Kicks on Route 66

Back in 2013, I posted a blog about an episode of the old TV series, Route 66, being filmed in Page. You can see that post >HERE<. If Route 66 was before your time, it was a show about two guys – Tod (with one “d”) and Buz (with one “z”) – driving the old Route 66 in a cool Corvette Stingray and doing stuff. You may know Route 66 as Interstate 40. Season One, Episode Nine of Route 66 was filmed in Page and at the Glen Canyon Dam site when it was under construction. This episode aired on November 2, 1960 and was entitled, Layout at Glen Canyon. Construction on the dam was in its early stages and the bridge dedication took place the year before.

In this post, I want to tease out a little more trivia by way of some still images I made of the show while watching it. Some of these are little blurry but clear enough to see what’s going on. Enjoy!

This first image above is one I used on the original post in 2013. They’re filming the scene where the women are getting off the plane. Click this image and enlarge it. Take a look at the all the details and notice the sign on the side of the truck. I’m not sure what the thing on the cart is. Careful leaning on that Corvette people! We lived at the airport (literally) and this scene wasn’t too far from our trailer’s front door. But I don’t remember them making this show. Here are some stills from the show:

This early scene shows Tod (Martin Milner of Adam-12 fame) and Buz (George Maharis) in a deep discussion just before the models get on the bus to be escorted to where they are staying, which was a couple of trailers somewhere near where the “P” was painted along US89. You can see Manson Mesa in the background of the scenes filmed at those trailers if you watch the show. In the picture above, the line of trailers is P Street, the last street of the trailer court, next to the airport. Our trailer was to the right of this picture right behind (literally!) the hanger. Here’s a wider shot of the area:

The picture above is a wider shot of the trailers behind the airport along P Street. The dirt driveway that Tod and Buz are headed to was the entrance off of P Street to the airport and the driveway to our trailer to the right of this picture. Here’s another action shot of the same scene: Continue reading “A Few More Kicks on Route 66”

More Upper Footbridge Mania

The shortest distance between two points is a straight line. Here’s proof:

The Upper Footbridge
This shot of the footbridge was buried in a PowerPoint presentation that was sent to me a few years ago. It’s undated. Click on it to enlarge.

 

The photo above was taken from the west side of the canyon. Behind the photographer was a circular parking lot built around a small sandstone hill. The next photo shows the parking lot and the photo below it is an image I took today using Google Earth that shows the remnants of the circular parking area as it appears today. This temporary foot bridge spanned Glen Canyon and was located just upstream of Glen Canyon Dam.

 

Here’s a view of the parking area on the west side of the upper footbridge.

 

Here’s the image I captured this morning on Google Earth showing how the parking area appears today.

 

From Google Earth. The horseshoe shaped parking area is wrapped around the sandstone hill on the left side of the canyon. The spillways are visible at the bottom of the photo.

 

I’ve written other posts about the upper footbridge. To see them all, type “footbridge” in the search box at the top of the page.

Enjoy!

-Mike

Movies, Movies, Movies

The area around Page has always been a prime location for movies and TV shows. The rugged and unusual terrain in the area makes it a unique spot for movie making. Here are a few of the movies/TV episodes I remember being filmed near Page:

  1. Route 66 Season 1, Episode 9, Layout at Glen Canyon (1960)
  2. The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965)
  3. Planet of the Apes (1968)
  4. Easy Rider (1969)
  5. The Outlaw Jose Wales (1976)
  6. Greatest Heroes of the Bible (1978) – A made for TV mini-series. I was an extra in one of these episodes and will be signing autographs later.
  7. Superman III (1983)
  8. Maverick (1994) – There’s a scene in this movie with houseboats visible in the background. Ooops!
  9. Broken Arrow (1996)
  10. Planet of the Apes (2001)
  11. Gravity (2013)

There were more, but you get the idea. Here are some pictures I wanted to share with you from the first Planet of the Apes movie from 1968. I don’t remember where I got these.

This shot looks like it was taken at Horseshoe Bend. Horseshoe Bend is just off highway US 89 just south of Page.

 

Those cool waters of Lake Powell were always so refreshing on hot days.

 

Boating and fishing in these side canyons was always a treat. But as we all know, these guys are heading toward disaster.

Enjoy!

-Mike